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tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Chris McMahon buys other people’s landscape paintings at thrift stores and puts monsters in them.

Previously: Artist Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

(via daughterofearthandstars)

Anonymous said: Vegan grocery list?? I'm just starting out and I don't even know what to buy!

sunflower-mama:

I’ll just write a list of some of my regular purchases to give ya inspiration.

In bulk:
Quinoa
Brown rice
Beans
Lentils
Granola
Dried fruits
Nuts
Pasta

Produce:
Kale
Chard
Spinach
Zucchini
Beets
Yams
Eggplant
Peppers
Cucumbers
Cilantro
Avocados
Tomatoes
Bananas
(Any and all fruits/veggies you like)

Seasonings/cooking supplies:
Nutritional yeast
Tamari
Liquid aminos (braggs)
Coconut oil
Basil
Balsamic vinegar

Animal product “substitutes”:
Tempeh/tofu
Almond/rice/hemp/coconut milk etcetera
Vegan cheese

Additional yummies:
Hummus (or make your own w/ garbanzo beans!!)
Seaweed
Tortillas
Spring roll wraps

RARE WORDS

acosmist - one who believes that nothing exists
paralian - a person who lives near the sea
aureate - pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - to wander about deliriously
sabaism - the worship of stars
dysphoria - an unwell feeling
aubade - a love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - to speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: , via sunflower-mama)

jeffsimpsonkh:

It’s my dad.
Oil and Photoshop

jeffsimpsonkh:

It’s my dad.

Oil and Photoshop

(via madeofmess)

detailsofpaintings:

Charles Chaplin, Junge Frau im Ballkleid mit Putten (details)

By 1895

(via madeofmess)

f-inked:

Oil alla prima from life

f-inked:

Oil alla prima from life

(via madeofmess)

madeofmess:

Trying to figure out a method of sketching that doesn’t make my head hurt.

madeofmess:

2 hour master study

eddamami:

nine-run-run:

gmathis67:

foodffs:

Avocado Cilantro Lime Rice

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

Nice. I don’t post a lot of food but would like to try this.

this looks divine

Making this tomorrow

(via appleemintt)

adreciclarte:

Camouflaged History by Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler

(Source: The New York Times)

talisman:

White Peach-Lavender SodaMakes about 4 to 6 servings (enough to fill a recycled 1-liter soda bottle) 1 cup water, plus more to fill the bottle 3/4 cup sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons lavender flowers  1 pound very ripe white peaches 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pinch salt 1/4 teaspoon champagne yeast or baker’s yeast Need: one clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle with screw-on cap
Bring the water to a boil in a small saucepan on the stovetop or in the microwave. Remove from heat and add the sugar and lavender flowers. Stir to dissolve to sugar. Let stand for 20 minutes to infuse the sugar water with lavender.

Wash and roughly chop the peaches. It is not necessary to peel them. Strain the lavender flowers and pour the infused sugar water over the fruit. Add the lemon juice and salt, and stir to combine. Let this stand for 10 minutes to macerate the fruit.

Working in batches, puree the peaches with the sugar-water in the food processor or blender. Strain the puree into a bowl, collecting as much juice as possible without forcing any solids through the strainer. You can also strain the juice through a flour sack towel or cheesecloth to yield a cleaner soda. You should end up with 1 1/2 to 2 cups concentrated fruit syrup.
 
At this point, you could stop, refrigerate the syrup, and add it to a glass of sparkling water to taste. To naturally carbonate the soda with yeast (you intrepid brewer you!), proceed onward.

Pour the juice into a clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle using a funnel (see note). Top off the bottle with water, leaving about an inch and a half of head room. Give it a taste and add more lemon juice or sugar if desired. The extra sugar will dissolve on its own.

Add the yeast. Screw on the cap and shake the bottle to dissolve and distribute the yeast. Let the bottle sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 12 to 48 hours. Exact fermentation time will depend on the temperature in the room. Check the bottle periodically; when it feels rock-solid with very little give, it’s ready.
 Refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 weeks. Open very slowly over a sink to release the pressure gradually and avoid bubble-ups.

Notes: 

• Feel free to substitute white nectarines, yellow peaches, or yellow nectarines for the fruit in this recipe. I’m also feeling tempted to try plums. The color and flavor will be slightly different, but most definitely still very tasty.

• For a stronger lavender flavor, infuse the sugar water for a longer period of time. Taste periodically and strain the sugar water when it tastes good to you. Since using more lavender can quickly make foods taste soapy, this is a safer way of amping up the flavor.

• I recommend using champagne yeast over baker’s yeast whenever possible. It has a crisp and clean flavor that lets the fruit shine through, whereas baker’s yeast tends to make sodas taste yeasty. Not a terrible thing, and fine in a soda-craving pinch, but get some champagne yeast if you can. It’s sold at any homebrew supply store and online at places like Northern Brewer.

• The fruit mash left after straining makes a very good afternoon snack with yogurt.

• Sodas can also be bottled in glass or swing-top bottles, but it’s more difficult to tell when the sodas have fully carbonated. To do this safely, with every batch you bottle also fill one small plastic soda bottle to use as an indicator for when the sodas have finished carbonating. Refrigerate all of the bottles as soon as the plastic bottle is carbonated; never leave the glass bottles at room temperature once carbonated.

talisman:

White Peach-Lavender Soda
Makes about 4 to 6 servings (enough to fill a recycled 1-liter soda bottle)

1 cup water, plus more to fill the bottle
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons lavender flowers
1 pound very ripe white peaches
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Pinch salt
1/4 teaspoon champagne yeast or baker’s yeast

Need: one clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle with screw-on cap

Bring the water to a boil in a small saucepan on the stovetop or in the microwave. Remove from heat and add the sugar and lavender flowers. Stir to dissolve to sugar. Let stand for 20 minutes to infuse the sugar water with lavender.
Wash and roughly chop the peaches. It is not necessary to peel them. Strain the lavender flowers and pour the infused sugar water over the fruit. Add the lemon juice and salt, and stir to combine. Let this stand for 10 minutes to macerate the fruit.
Working in batches, puree the peaches with the sugar-water in the food processor or blender. Strain the puree into a bowl, collecting as much juice as possible without forcing any solids through the strainer. You can also strain the juice through a flour sack towel or cheesecloth to yield a cleaner soda. You should end up with 1 1/2 to 2 cups concentrated fruit syrup.
 
At this point, you could stop, refrigerate the syrup, and add it to a glass of sparkling water to taste. To naturally carbonate the soda with yeast (you intrepid brewer you!), proceed onward.
Pour the juice into a clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle using a funnel (see note). Top off the bottle with water, leaving about an inch and a half of head room. Give it a taste and add more lemon juice or sugar if desired. The extra sugar will dissolve on its own.
Add the yeast. Screw on the cap and shake the bottle to dissolve and distribute the yeast. Let the bottle sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 12 to 48 hours. Exact fermentation time will depend on the temperature in the room. Check the bottle periodically; when it feels rock-solid with very little give, it’s ready.

Refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 weeks. Open very slowly over a sink to release the pressure gradually and avoid bubble-ups.
Notes: 
• Feel free to substitute white nectarines, yellow peaches, or yellow nectarines for the fruit in this recipe. I’m also feeling tempted to try plums. The color and flavor will be slightly different, but most definitely still very tasty.
• For a stronger lavender flavor, infuse the sugar water for a longer period of time. Taste periodically and strain the sugar water when it tastes good to you. Since using more lavender can quickly make foods taste soapy, this is a safer way of amping up the flavor.
• I recommend using champagne yeast over baker’s yeast whenever possible. It has a crisp and clean flavor that lets the fruit shine through, whereas baker’s yeast tends to make sodas taste yeasty. Not a terrible thing, and fine in a soda-craving pinch, but get some champagne yeast if you can. It’s sold at any homebrew supply store and online at places like Northern Brewer.
• The fruit mash left after straining makes a very good afternoon snack with yogurt.
• Sodas can also be bottled in glass or swing-top bottles, but it’s more difficult to tell when the sodas have fully carbonated. To do this safely, with every batch you bottle also fill one small plastic soda bottle to use as an indicator for when the sodas have finished carbonating. Refrigerate all of the bottles as soon as the plastic bottle is carbonated; never leave the glass bottles at room temperature once carbonated.

(via coolwitchmom)

tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Chris McMahon buys other people’s landscape paintings at thrift stores and puts monsters in them.

Previously: Artist Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

(via daughterofearthandstars)

Anonymous said: Vegan grocery list?? I'm just starting out and I don't even know what to buy!

sunflower-mama:

I’ll just write a list of some of my regular purchases to give ya inspiration.

In bulk:
Quinoa
Brown rice
Beans
Lentils
Granola
Dried fruits
Nuts
Pasta

Produce:
Kale
Chard
Spinach
Zucchini
Beets
Yams
Eggplant
Peppers
Cucumbers
Cilantro
Avocados
Tomatoes
Bananas
(Any and all fruits/veggies you like)

Seasonings/cooking supplies:
Nutritional yeast
Tamari
Liquid aminos (braggs)
Coconut oil
Basil
Balsamic vinegar

Animal product “substitutes”:
Tempeh/tofu
Almond/rice/hemp/coconut milk etcetera
Vegan cheese

Additional yummies:
Hummus (or make your own w/ garbanzo beans!!)
Seaweed
Tortillas
Spring roll wraps

RARE WORDS

acosmist - one who believes that nothing exists
paralian - a person who lives near the sea
aureate - pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - to wander about deliriously
sabaism - the worship of stars
dysphoria - an unwell feeling
aubade - a love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - to speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: , via sunflower-mama)

sentirsi:


Van Gogh - Roses

 

sentirsi:

Van Gogh - Roses

 

(Source: confers, via starrycutie)

euo:

maurizio cattelan 

euo:

maurizio cattelan 

(via nachtvogelfrei)

(Source: johto-jordan, via mag-wildwood)

jeffsimpsonkh:

It’s my dad.
Oil and Photoshop

jeffsimpsonkh:

It’s my dad.

Oil and Photoshop

(via madeofmess)

detailsofpaintings:

Charles Chaplin, Junge Frau im Ballkleid mit Putten (details)

By 1895

(via madeofmess)

f-inked:

Oil alla prima from life

f-inked:

Oil alla prima from life

(via madeofmess)

madeofmess:

Trying to figure out a method of sketching that doesn’t make my head hurt.

madeofmess:

2 hour master study

eddamami:

nine-run-run:

gmathis67:

foodffs:

Avocado Cilantro Lime Rice

Really nice recipes. Every hour.

Nice. I don’t post a lot of food but would like to try this.

this looks divine

Making this tomorrow

(via appleemintt)

adreciclarte:

Camouflaged History by Kate Ericson and Mel Ziegler

(Source: The New York Times)

talisman:

White Peach-Lavender SodaMakes about 4 to 6 servings (enough to fill a recycled 1-liter soda bottle) 1 cup water, plus more to fill the bottle 3/4 cup sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons lavender flowers  1 pound very ripe white peaches 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pinch salt 1/4 teaspoon champagne yeast or baker’s yeast Need: one clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle with screw-on cap
Bring the water to a boil in a small saucepan on the stovetop or in the microwave. Remove from heat and add the sugar and lavender flowers. Stir to dissolve to sugar. Let stand for 20 minutes to infuse the sugar water with lavender.

Wash and roughly chop the peaches. It is not necessary to peel them. Strain the lavender flowers and pour the infused sugar water over the fruit. Add the lemon juice and salt, and stir to combine. Let this stand for 10 minutes to macerate the fruit.

Working in batches, puree the peaches with the sugar-water in the food processor or blender. Strain the puree into a bowl, collecting as much juice as possible without forcing any solids through the strainer. You can also strain the juice through a flour sack towel or cheesecloth to yield a cleaner soda. You should end up with 1 1/2 to 2 cups concentrated fruit syrup.
 
At this point, you could stop, refrigerate the syrup, and add it to a glass of sparkling water to taste. To naturally carbonate the soda with yeast (you intrepid brewer you!), proceed onward.

Pour the juice into a clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle using a funnel (see note). Top off the bottle with water, leaving about an inch and a half of head room. Give it a taste and add more lemon juice or sugar if desired. The extra sugar will dissolve on its own.

Add the yeast. Screw on the cap and shake the bottle to dissolve and distribute the yeast. Let the bottle sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 12 to 48 hours. Exact fermentation time will depend on the temperature in the room. Check the bottle periodically; when it feels rock-solid with very little give, it’s ready.
 Refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 weeks. Open very slowly over a sink to release the pressure gradually and avoid bubble-ups.

Notes: 

• Feel free to substitute white nectarines, yellow peaches, or yellow nectarines for the fruit in this recipe. I’m also feeling tempted to try plums. The color and flavor will be slightly different, but most definitely still very tasty.

• For a stronger lavender flavor, infuse the sugar water for a longer period of time. Taste periodically and strain the sugar water when it tastes good to you. Since using more lavender can quickly make foods taste soapy, this is a safer way of amping up the flavor.

• I recommend using champagne yeast over baker’s yeast whenever possible. It has a crisp and clean flavor that lets the fruit shine through, whereas baker’s yeast tends to make sodas taste yeasty. Not a terrible thing, and fine in a soda-craving pinch, but get some champagne yeast if you can. It’s sold at any homebrew supply store and online at places like Northern Brewer.

• The fruit mash left after straining makes a very good afternoon snack with yogurt.

• Sodas can also be bottled in glass or swing-top bottles, but it’s more difficult to tell when the sodas have fully carbonated. To do this safely, with every batch you bottle also fill one small plastic soda bottle to use as an indicator for when the sodas have finished carbonating. Refrigerate all of the bottles as soon as the plastic bottle is carbonated; never leave the glass bottles at room temperature once carbonated.

talisman:

White Peach-Lavender Soda
Makes about 4 to 6 servings (enough to fill a recycled 1-liter soda bottle)

1 cup water, plus more to fill the bottle
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons lavender flowers
1 pound very ripe white peaches
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Pinch salt
1/4 teaspoon champagne yeast or baker’s yeast

Need: one clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle with screw-on cap

Bring the water to a boil in a small saucepan on the stovetop or in the microwave. Remove from heat and add the sugar and lavender flowers. Stir to dissolve to sugar. Let stand for 20 minutes to infuse the sugar water with lavender.
Wash and roughly chop the peaches. It is not necessary to peel them. Strain the lavender flowers and pour the infused sugar water over the fruit. Add the lemon juice and salt, and stir to combine. Let this stand for 10 minutes to macerate the fruit.
Working in batches, puree the peaches with the sugar-water in the food processor or blender. Strain the puree into a bowl, collecting as much juice as possible without forcing any solids through the strainer. You can also strain the juice through a flour sack towel or cheesecloth to yield a cleaner soda. You should end up with 1 1/2 to 2 cups concentrated fruit syrup.
 
At this point, you could stop, refrigerate the syrup, and add it to a glass of sparkling water to taste. To naturally carbonate the soda with yeast (you intrepid brewer you!), proceed onward.
Pour the juice into a clean 1-liter plastic soda bottle using a funnel (see note). Top off the bottle with water, leaving about an inch and a half of head room. Give it a taste and add more lemon juice or sugar if desired. The extra sugar will dissolve on its own.
Add the yeast. Screw on the cap and shake the bottle to dissolve and distribute the yeast. Let the bottle sit at room temperature out of direct sunlight for 12 to 48 hours. Exact fermentation time will depend on the temperature in the room. Check the bottle periodically; when it feels rock-solid with very little give, it’s ready.

Refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 weeks. Open very slowly over a sink to release the pressure gradually and avoid bubble-ups.
Notes: 
• Feel free to substitute white nectarines, yellow peaches, or yellow nectarines for the fruit in this recipe. I’m also feeling tempted to try plums. The color and flavor will be slightly different, but most definitely still very tasty.
• For a stronger lavender flavor, infuse the sugar water for a longer period of time. Taste periodically and strain the sugar water when it tastes good to you. Since using more lavender can quickly make foods taste soapy, this is a safer way of amping up the flavor.
• I recommend using champagne yeast over baker’s yeast whenever possible. It has a crisp and clean flavor that lets the fruit shine through, whereas baker’s yeast tends to make sodas taste yeasty. Not a terrible thing, and fine in a soda-craving pinch, but get some champagne yeast if you can. It’s sold at any homebrew supply store and online at places like Northern Brewer.
• The fruit mash left after straining makes a very good afternoon snack with yogurt.
• Sodas can also be bottled in glass or swing-top bottles, but it’s more difficult to tell when the sodas have fully carbonated. To do this safely, with every batch you bottle also fill one small plastic soda bottle to use as an indicator for when the sodas have finished carbonating. Refrigerate all of the bottles as soon as the plastic bottle is carbonated; never leave the glass bottles at room temperature once carbonated.

(via coolwitchmom)

RARE WORDS

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